TERA Newsletter – Vol. 3 Issue 1

//TERA Newsletter – Vol. 3 Issue 1

TERA Newsletter – Vol. 3 Issue 1

Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 1

(December 2017 – March 2018)

Teaching & Education Research Association

info@eurasiaresearch.org

 

Dear TERA Members,

Thank you for your interest and support in our organization. We are happy to present the newsletter for our Association. Here are some of the glimpses of our current and upcoming endeavors.

Conferences Held

TERA has successfully organized following International conferences in the period of December 2017 – March 2018:

  • 27-Dec- 2017 to 28-Dec- 2017, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Conference Center, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 20-Dec- 2017 to 21-Dec- 2017 at Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
  • 14-Dec- 2017 to 15-Dec- 2017 at Middlesex University Mauritius, Droopnath Ramphul, St. Vacoas-Phoenix, Mauritius
  • 18-Feb- 2018 to 19-Feb- 2018 at Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Our TERA International Conference began with opening remarks by Honourable Keynote speaker highlighting the main context on Social Issues.The main aim of this conference was:
  • To discuss latest challenges/researches being faced by the Society regarding Learning and Teaching issues
  • Generating academic and professional relationships
  • Boosting morale and confidence of researchers in an international platform
  • Networking among the participants
  • Providing a holistic experience of academic tourism

Our worthy Keynote speakers open up the conference enlightening participants with their speech.

Here is the List of keynote speakers who participated in our conferences:

Dr. Karen Pettit
(Campus Director, Middlesex University Mauritius Branch Campus, Mauritius)
Middlesex University Mauritius, Cascavelle, Coastal Road, Flic en Flac, Mauritius (New Campus)
Dr. Nicky Torrance
(Associate Director Academic, Middlesex Mauritius Branch Campus, Mauritius)

Middlesex University Mauritius, Cascavelle, Coastal Road, Flic en Flac, Mauritius (New Campus)
Anam Shahid

(Assistant Professor, Department of Academics, Faculty of Business Studies, Cromwell UK International Education, Ajman, UAE)

Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
John Senior
(Department of Academics, English Enhancement Program, Amity University, Dubai Dubai, U.A.E.)

Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Dr. K. Ravichandran
(Director of Experiential Education, Associate Professor, School of Management, New York Institute of Technology, Abu Dhabi, UAE)
Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Rossitsa M. Yalamova
(Faculty of Management, University of Lethbridge, Canada)
Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Prof. William Sharpton

(College of Liberal Arts, Education and Human DevelopmentDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction, The University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA USA)
Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

In order to Promote Young Researchers, Eurasia Research International conferences, Provides Young Research Scholarship (YRS) in the form of full Registration fee waiver to participate in such events.

In each, Eurasia Research International conference, Best Paper award is given to Best Researches. In Teaching and Education Research Association (TERA), Best paper award is given to the participants with the best scholarly paper submitted and presented at the conference.

(Photo Not Available)
Sweta Rout-Hoolash
(Department of International Education, Middlesex University, Mauritius)
Middlesex University Mauritius, Cascavelle, Coastal Road, Flic en Flac, Mauritius (New Campus)

Abstract
Contemporary British higher education curriculums inherently encompass the concepts of group work or collaborative learning into their study programmes. At Middlesex University Mauritius, the academic experience for the majority of students also includes group project work as an assessment tool – both formative and summative. However, almost everyone in the student population is an international student on this offshore British university campus. Within this multi-cultural setting, there is also large diversity among students in prior learning experiences at school.
This is a practice-based study that presents the concept of assessed, multi-cultural group project work within modern-day teaching, learning and assessment theoretical frameworks. By establishing group work as ‘troublesome knowledge’ (Meyer and Land 2003) for many students, this talk will serve as a reminder to university staff of the challenges faced by students as they navigate through this new learning environment.
Rout-Hoolash (2014) identified the important role that small group project work plays on the International Foundation Program (IFP). It used the student voice through their learning diary (reflective blog) entries and highlighted how former IFP students managed group work tasks. This study builds on that one to see if students’ reflective accounts support the theoretical framework that engaging in group work can be characterized as a threshold concept (Cousin, 2006).Similar to findings in Hassanien (2007) and Gatfield (1999), previous IFP students identified the group project phase as the single most satisfactory experience of the whole programme, despite initially approaching it with mainly negative feelings.
Keywords: Collaborative Learning; Group Project Work; Assessment; Troublesome Knowledge; Threshold Concepts.

Binulal KR

Assistant Professor, Department of Education, Mount Tabor Training College, Pathanapuram, Kollam, Kerala, India, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Abstract

In the modern world of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), teaching-learning process utilizes several innovative tools such as social networking, e-contents, video conferencing, learning management system, etc. It is imperative in the present system of education is to make use of social networking technologies to enable collaboration among the students. EDMDO is an online learning management platform facilitated by the teacher to enhance the interaction and collaboration among students. Also, it helps to improve the competencies of the students to utilize promises of ICT in their learning. In the present study, the investigators used ‘EDMODO’ as a learning platform for the student teachers in their curriculum-based learning. They were given an opportunity to learn the e-content (prepared in Blendspace), take assignments and quizzes. The major purpose of the study was to find out the perception of student teachers towards the use of EDMODO as a self-learning tool. The survey method was adopted by the investigators for the present study and data were collected with the help of perception scale and ICT proficiency test. The analysis of the results revealed that the learning activities provided by EDMODO have enhanced their learning and improved the ICT proficiency. The study recommends that the implementation of EDMODO by the teacher educators as a learning platform for the students could become a powerful medium that extends responsible, self-regulating learning environment beyond the boundaries of the classroom.

Keywords:  Information Communication Technology, Edmodo, Learning management system, Social Networking, self-learning, ICT proficiency.

 

Simon D. C. Townsend
(English Lecturer / ICT Administrator, Iwate University, Morioka City, Japan)
Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Conference Center, Bangkok, Thailand

Shoba Macintyre

Papar District Education Office, Open University Malaysia, Sabah, Malaysia, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Conference Center, Bangkok, Thailand

Abstract

Whether you are a School Improvement Specialist Coach, school leader, school administrator or head teacher, you’ve probably met ‘them’. Who’s ‘them’? Great teacher-innovators hiding in their schools not wanting to come out into the open world and share what they know. This paper charts the journey of 4 such teachers in primary and secondary schools in Papar, Sabah. They are actively involved in innovative research and have developed their own teaching innovations – but only for their students. The first research objective was to determine whether coaching as a strategy, could change teachers’ mindsets on sharing their innovations to a wider audience. A needs analysis done at the preliminary stages of this mixed method research revealed that majority of teachers chose Facebook as their preferred online platform due to familiarity. The results also revealed that lack of confidence was the main reason why they refrained from sharing their innovations. Their lack of confidence stemmed from poor self-belief, lack of management and procedural knowledge, lack of IT-related skills and the inability to network extensively. Therefore, the second objective was to discover if using Facebook as a tool for sharing, could increase their confidence. In monitoring for change, comparisons were made between two groups of teachers within a span of 6 weeks. The experimental group was given interventions using coaching and mentoring strategies while the control group was left to complete their tasks independently but with instructions. The findings showed that the experimental group was able to develop online pages and showed increased levels of confidence especially after receiving positive feedback from stranger-teachers on Facebook. This study concludes that the coaching and mentoring interventions used increased teachers’ confidence to share their work on a global platform. Future applications pertaining this study can include school leadership, Open Educational Resources, and teacher talent management.  

 

Jean Gabrielle Cruz  

(Business Management Department, De La Salle University – Dasmarinas, Dasmarinas City, Philippines)

Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Abstract:

The study determined the existing solid waste management practices of the three fastest growing cities in the province of Cavite namely: Bacoor, Dasmarinas, and Imus. Data were gathered from secondary sources and paid in-depth attention to published materials. Results show the lack of equipment and facilities to implement such practices mandated by law. In addition to this, regulatory and enforcement powers with public education, awareness and involvement campaigns are not properly implemented. Generally, the National Government must strengthen the Ecological Solid Waste Management law of 2000. It should be made known and published to all Local Governments and must adhere to the rules. Also, the Local Government Units should impose a Solid Waste Management Plan and build their own Solid Waste Management Board that can be sustained throughout the years to come.

Keywords: solid waste, solid waste management, Solid Waste Management Plan

 

Brian Beitzel

(Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling and Special Education, SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta, NY, USA)

Flora Grand Hotel, Near Al Rigga Metro Station, Deira, Dubai, United Arab Emirates


Abstract:

Diagrams are a commonly used device to assist problem-solvers in arriving at accurate solutions, particularly in the context of mathematics word problems. Creating such diagrams requires some attention to detail, thus raising the question of whether the additional mental effort results in improved problem-solving accuracy.  This paper re-analyzes data from a series of randomized, controlled experiments conducted over the past decade, examining the relationship between mental effort and performance on mathematics word problems.  The general methodology for these studies includes (a) pretest; (b) instruction/training; and (c) posttest.  Pretest scores were used to control for prior knowledge in all other analyses.  Three distinct types of probability were investigated in these experiments: conditional, joint, and total.  The training materials were either paper-based or computer-based and provided all instruction necessary for success on the posttest.  The posttest was a series of word problems; some experiments included the second posttest after a delay.  The findings from this analysis demonstrate two distinct patterns in the relationship between mental effort and problem-solving performance. First, for conditional-probability problems, when undergraduate students are trained to use only equations they report a higher level of mental effort and achieve lower performance on the posttest.  The reverse is true when students are trained to use tree diagrams to solve these same problems.  The second pattern is that for joint- and total-probability problems when undergraduates are trained to use only equations they achieve higher posttest performance and report lower mental effort.  The reverse is true here also: students trained to use a diagram to solve these same problems report higher levels of mental effort and achieve lower performance.  The bottom line is counterintuitive yet borne out across this series of experiments: the mental effort undergraduates expend employing diagrams to help them solve math problems is not consistently associated with superior performance.

Keywords: Mathematics representations, diagrams, problem-solving, mental effort

2018-03-25T10:14:27+00:00
Translate »